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Footnotes

Householding Yogi: One who is not a monastic, lives a lay life and seeks to train the mind towards enlightenment. allan cooper

Yogi: 1. Theravada: The one who trains in the development of concentration. Person who practices satipatthana or samatha meditation. Source: Dhamma Dana: Pali English Glossary. 2. Synonym for meditator. allan cooper

Home Practice: Whatever the practice a meditator might have at home. It could be very focused or loose. The criteria for having a Home Practice is how we hold our meditative life. If we hold our spiritual life as our core we can consider our life as having a Home Practice. One who has a Home Practice is inclined to try and improve themselves with attention to virtue, concentration and wisdom. allan cooper

Meditative wisdom: Intuitive insights into the Three Characteristics: impermanence, suffering/unsatisfactoriness, and non-self which leads to freedom from unwholesome patterns of mind, speech and action. allan cooper

 Skillful means: (Upāya) Way, means, expedient, stratagem. Buddhist Dictionary, Nyanatiloka.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Investigation: (dhamma-vicaya) 1. Investigation (intention). The Noble Eightfold Path, Bhikkhu Bodhi. Chapter Three. 2. The Way of Mindfulness, Soma Thera. Chapter: The Factors of Enlightenment. 3. Investigation is one of the 4 Roads to Power and one of the 4 Predominants of Truth: dhamma-vicaya, is one the 7 Factors of Enlightenment. Buddhist Dictionary, Nyanatiloka.

Concentration: (samādhi) The (mental) state of being firmly fixed, is the fixing of the mind on a single object. Buddhist Dictionary, Nyanatiloka. 2. The Noble Eightfold Path, Bhikkhu Bodhi. Chapter Eight. Right Concentration (sammā-samādhi).

Effort/Right Effort: (sammā-vāyāma) 1. (Pali: sammappadhāna; is an integral part of the Buddhist path to Enlightenment. Built on the insightful recognition of the arising and non-arising of various mental qualities over time and of our ability to mindfully intervene in these ephemeral qualities, the Four Right Exertions encourage the relinquishment of harmful mental qualities and the nurturing of beneficial mental qualities. 2. SN 45.8 Maggasaṃyutta; Connected Discourses on the Path. 3. The Noble Eightfold Path: Way to the End of Suffering. Sammā-vāyāma, Chapter Four. Bhikkhu Bodhi.

Patience: (kanti) 1. Forbearance is one of the 10 Perfections (pārami). Buddhist Dictionary. Nyanatiloka. 2. Patience is more than forbearance. Patience is a state of mind that allows forgiveness and empathy to arise. It is a state of equipoise in the face of either pleasant or unpleasant. allan cooper. 3. Patience is mentioned immediately after energy in the list of paramis. (a) because patience is perfected by energy, as it is said: “The energetic man, by arousing his energy, overcomes the suffering imposed by beings and formations.” The Treatise on the Paramis, Acaiya Dhammapala.

Wholesome(ness): (kusala) 1. And what is the wholesome? Abstention from the destruction of life is wholesome; abstention from taking what is not given is wholesome; abstention from sexual misconduct is wholesome; abstention from false speech is wholesome; abstention from divisive speech is wholesome; abstention from harsh speech is wholesome; abstention from idle chatter is wholesome… and what is the root of the wholesome? Non-greed is a root of the wholesome; non-hatred is a root of the wholesome; non-delusion is a root of the wholesome. — from MN9, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi. 2. Wholesomeness is the binding agent for all spiritual growth. Meditative wisdom cannot be realized without it being rooted in wholesomeness. allan cooper.

The Noble Eightfold Path: 1. (Pali: ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo) is an early summary of the path of Buddhist practices leading to liberation from samsara, the painful cycle of rebirth. The Eightfold Path consists of eight practices: right view, right resolve, right speech, right conduct, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration. The Noble Eightfold Path is one of the principal teachings of Theravada Buddhism, taught to lead to Arhatship. In the Theravada tradition, this path is also summarized as silā (morality), samadhi (meditation) and pañña (insight). Wikipedia.  2. The core teachings of Buddhist philosophy and the ‘how to’ foundation for all Buddhist meditative practices. allan cooper. 3. Please consult: The Noble Eightfold Path; Way to the End of Suffering, Bhikkhu Bodhi.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Eightfold Path: Way to the End of Suffering, Bhikkhu Bodhi.

Mahasi Sayadaw: Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahasi_Sayadaw

Theravadā/School of the Elders: 1. Oldest extant form of Buddhist practice. Most commonly found in Myanmar, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, and Laos. 2. Western vipassanā or Insight meditation finds most of its roots in this school of practice.
 
Vipassanā: 1. In English vipassanā, mindfulness, sati, and insight, are often used interchangeably to describe the meditation practice of bringing one’s unfiltered attention to our experience at any of the six sense doors. The Pali term sati is also commonly used to mean vipassanā. allan cooper 2. Vipassanā, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India’s most ancient techniques of meditation. It was rediscovered by Gotama Buddha more than 2500 years ago and was taught by him as a universal remedy for universal ills. This non-sectarian technique aims for the total eradication of mental impurities and the resultant highest happiness of full liberation. https://www.dhamma.org/en/about/vipassana (unknown) 3. Insight meditation (vipassanā): Attending to objects of consciousness with bare attention. 4. ‘The Noble Eightfold Path: Way to the End of Suffering’, Chapter Six, ‘Sammā-Sati’, Bhikkhu Bodhi.
 
Sati: 1. ‘Mindfulness’ is one of the Five Spiritual Faculties and Powers, one of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment and the Seventh link of the Noble Eightfold Path, and is, in its widest sense, one of those mental factors insperarperaly associated with all karmically wholesome and karma-produced lofty consciousness. Buddhist Dictionary by Nyanatiloka. 2. Sati, vipassanā and insight meditation are often used interchangeably in English. For the purpose of this Guide it is helpful to translate vipassanā to mean sati-sampajañña, and that sati and sampajañña as having different and distinct meanings. allan cooper.
 
Sampajañña: 1. Clear Comprehension: 2. Attending to four categories of attention: Purpose, Suitability, Domain, and Reality. allan cooper. 3. ‘The Heart of Buddhist Meditation’, Nyanaponika Thera. 4. Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta. MN:10.
 
Sati-sampajañña: 1. Sati and sampajañña are two terms combined to mean one thing. Sati is the function of the mind that can bring meditative focus on any conscious object and get to know it without self-referencing or preference. Sampajañña is the wholesome attempt to understand what an object is. Without sampajañña sati is simply a function of the mind without understanding. Sampajañña without sati is speculation. Combined these mental functions can de-condition and reorient the mind towards freedom from unwholesome patterns of mind, speech and action. allan cooper 2. Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta MN:10.
 

Yogi: 1. Theravada: The one who trains in the development of concentration. Person who practices satipatthana or samatha meditation. Source: Dhamma Dana: Pali English Glossary. 2. Synonym for meditator. Allan Cooper

Vinaya: 1. Basket of the Discipline. 2. The vinaya, literally meaning “leading out,” “education,” and “discipline.” It is the regulatory framework for the sangha or monastic community of Buddhism based on the canonical texts called the Vinaya Pitaka. Wikipedia. 3. In other words, the rules and conventions that all Buddhist monastics agree to adhere to when they are ordained. Code of conduct. Livelihood. allan cooper.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Restraint of the Senses: (indriya-samvara) 1. Restraint of the senses is a multi-tiered meditative practice that encompasses a conscious effort to restrain our speech and actions in the outer world and to bring sati to any sense object at the moment of its arising in consciousness. By not indulging in the habit of taking that which is pleasant in a mental process that leads to clinging or that which is unpleasant in a mental process that leads to aversion, we train the mind to stay with what is. allan cooper 2. Sense restraint is a practice within Clear Comprehension. Circumstances define what skills we apply. Applied sense restraint is a ‘Gradual Path’ which is supported by continuous determination imbued with a caring patience. allan cooper 3. AN 4:198. 4. AN 4:37 5. DN 2:64, 6. MN 38.

Renunciation: (nekkhamma) 1. In the Noble Eightfold Path , nekkhamma is the first practice associated with Right Intention. In the Theravada list of ten perfections, nekkhamma is the third practice of perfection (pārami). It involves non-attachment (detachment) and limiting choices. Wikipedia. 2. Renunciation is an everyday practice that can simplify a person’s life by eliminating habitual reliance on habit and preference. allan cooper 3. MN 137:10-15.

Right Speech: (sammā-sankappa) 1 . The Noble Eightfold Path: The Way to End Suffering. Chapter Four. Bhikkhu Bodhi. 2. MN 117: 3. MN 61:4. DN 2: 5. SN 45:8, 6. AN 5:198, 7. AN 10:176, etc.

Right Action: (sammā-kammanta) The Noble Eightfold Path: The Way to End Suffering. Chapter Three. etc.

Right Livelihood: (sammā-ājīva) The Noble Eightfold Path: The Way to End Suffering. Chapter Three. etc.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Samatha: 1. Concentration meditation: Attending to a single object of meditation without interruption. 2. ‘The Noble Eightfold Path: Way to the End of Suffering’, Chapter Seven, ‘Sammā-Samādhi’, Bhikkhu Bodhi.

Three Characteristics: (ti-lakkhana) 1. The ‘Three Characteristics of existence, or signata, are Impermanence (anicca), suffering/dissatisfaction or misery (dukkha) and Not-Self (anattā). Buddhist Dictionary by Nyanatiloka. 2. In Buddhism, the three marks of existence are three characteristics of all existence and beings, namely impermanence (anicca), unsatisfactoriness or suffering (dukkha), and non-self (anattā). These three characteristics are mentioned in verses 277, 278 and 279 of the Dhammapada. That humans are subject to delusion about the three marks, that this delusion results in suffering/dissatisfaction, and that removal of that delusion results in the end of suffering/dissatisfaction, are central themes in the Buddhist Four Noble Truths and Noble Eightfold Path. Wikipedia.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Virtue, Morality: (sīla) Is a mode of mind and volition manifested in speech or bodily actions. Karma. It is the foundation of the whole Buddhist practice, and therewith the first of the Three kinds of Training that forms the 3-fold division of the 8-fold path, i.e., morality, concentration, and wisdom. Buddhist Dictionary, Nyanatiloka.

Wisdom: (pañña) Understanding, Knowledge, Wisdom, Insight, comprise a very wide field. The specific Buddhist Knowledge or wisdom, however, as part of the Noble Eightfold Path to deliverance is Insight, i.e., that intuitive knowledge which brings about the four stages of Holiness and the realization of Nibbānna, and which consists of the penetration of the Impermanency, Misery, and Impersonality of all forms of existence. Buddhist Dictionary, Nyanatiloka.

Papañca: Complication; proliferation, objectification: The tendency of the mind to proliferate issues.

Right Intention: (sammā-sankappa) The Noble Eightfold Path. Bhikkhu Bodhi. Chapter Three.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Right Intention: (sammā-sankappa) The Noble Eightfold Path. Bhikkhu Bodhi. Chapter Three.

Munindraji: 1. Was an Indian lay teacher most often associated in the West as being Joseph Goldstein’s and Dipama’s teacher. His impact on how Theravada Buddhism is understood in the West cannot be overstated. In the book Living This Life Fully: Stories and Teachings of Munindra, 2010, by Mirka Knaster the reader is given a most extraordinary example of how to live a Home Retreat as a layperson. allan cooper.

Vikāla-bhojanā veramanī sikkhāpadam samādhiyāmi’, I undertake the Precept to refrain from eating at the forbidden time (i.e., afternoon till the sun rises the next day). I will eat with an attention towards sustenance with applied mindfulness and clear comprehension during all drinking and eating.

See template in index.

Sati-sampajañña: Mindfulness and Clear Comprehension 1. Sati and sampajañña are two terms combined to mean one thing. Sati is the function of the mind that can bring meditative focus on any conscious object and get to know it without self-referencing or preference. Sampajañña is the wholesome attempt to understand what an object is. Without sampajañña sati is simply a function of the mind without understanding. Sampajañña without sati is speculation. Combined these mental functions can de-condition and reorient the mind towards freedom from unwholesome patterns of mind, speech and action. allan cooper 2. Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta: MN:10.

Sampajañña: Clear Comprehension 1. Attending to four categories of attention: Purpose, Suitability, Domain, and Reality. allan cooper. 2. ‘The Heart of Buddhist Meditation’, Nyanaponika Thera. 3. Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta. MN:10.

Spiritual friend: (kalyānamitta) 1. SN 45:2 Upaddha Sutta 2. Access to Insight, ‘Admirable Friendship: Kalyanamitta. 3. In common usage ‘a spiritual friend.’ In a traditional sense it means a teacher or a knower of the way. allan cooper

Right View:(sammā-ditthi) 1. The Noble Eightfold Path: Way to the End of Suffering, Chapter Two. Bhikkhu Bodhi.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Determination: (adhitthāna) 1. Foundation: Four Foundations of an Arahat’s mentality. 2. Determination, resolution. 3. Perfection of Resolution (paramis). Buddhist Dictionary. Nyanatiloka.

Spiritual Faculties: (indriya) and Five spiritual faculties: (indriya-samatta) 1. Equilibrium, Balance, or Harmony of the Faculties, relates to the five spiritual faculties: Faith, Energy, Mindfulness, Concentration, and Wisdom. 2. The spiritual faculties are more important to the practice of vipassanā than this definition seems to imply. Balance of the mind/heart opens oneself to enlightenment. The practice of meditation is a constant process of refining of our intuitive abilities through the understanding of the Three Characteristics and only when the spiritual faculties are balanced can this occur. allan cooper 3. SN 48.10. Indriya- vibhanga Sutta: Analysis of the Mental Faculties. 4. Buddhist Dictionary; indriya-samatta. p. 67.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Pāramis: (perfections): Ten qualities leading to Buddha-hood: (1) Perfection in Giving (or Liberality; dāna-pārami), (2) in Morality (silā), (3) Renunciation (nekkhamma), (4) Wisdom (pañña), (5) Energy (viriya), (6) Patience (or Forbearance; khanti), (7) Truthfulness (sacca), (8) Resolution (adhiṭṭhāna), (9) Loving-kindness (mettā), (10) Equanimity (upekkhā). Buddhist Dictionary, Nyanatiloka. 2. https://www.insightmeditationcenter.org/books-articles/articles/theparamis/ Insight Meditation Society.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Hindrances: (nīvarana) 1. AN 9:64 Nivarana Sutta: Hindrances. 2. The Noble Eightfold Path: Way to the End of Suffering, Chapter Four. Bhikkhu Bodhi. 3. In common usage the term hindrance means those mental states that prevent the yogi from concentrating the mind on a continuous basis. Yet, because they are so common to the mind stream they are especially rich objects to bring our non-judgemental sati-sampajañña towards, to observe in order to learn what happens. allan cooper.

Yogi Mind: A contemporary term to mean when during retreat the mind can manifest any/all of the following: obsession, swings of mood, refusing to cooperate, having the hindrances frequently arising, and/or to be under a cloud of confusion. allan cooper.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Going for Refuge & Taking the Precepts, Bhikkhu Bodhi. 2. See Homage, Refuges, and Precepts in the index.

Merit: (puñña) 1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merit_(Buddhism). Wikipedia. 2. Sharing merit (puñña-dhārā), in some variation is to silently or out loud offer phrases such as, “I share whatever merit I have with all beings everywhere so they too, like myself, may attain happiness, peacefulness and complete freedom from suffering.’ 3.  Merit: A Study Guide, Thanissaro Bhikkhu. 4, Mudita: The Buddha’s Teaching on Unselfish Joy,’ Access to Insight.

Mettā: 1.Loving-kindness): 1. The Four Sublime States: Contemplations on Love, Compassion, Sympathetic Joy and Equanimity. 2. Nyanaponika Thera. Note: Kindness is the balance of all four.

See mealtime chant in the index.

Formal ForgivenessSee suggestion at end of the Guide.

The Four Sublime States: (brahma viharas)  Contemplations on Love, Compassion, Sympathetic Joy and Equanimity, Nyanaponika Thera. http://www.vipassana.com/meditation/four_sublime_states.php.

Paramis1. Perfection. 2. Ten qualities leading to Buddhahood: a. Generosity. b. Morality. c. Renunciation. d. Wisdom. e. Energy. f. Patience. g. Truthfulness. h. Resolution/determination. i. Loving-kindness. j. Equanimity.

Forgiveness: (khama) Forgiving; enduring; bearing tolerance; patience; endurance. Wisdom Dictionary.

Faith: (saddhā) 1. Faith in early Buddhism focused on the Triple Gem, that is, the Buddha; his teaching (the dharma); and finally, the community of spiritually developed followers or the monastic community seeking enlightenment (the saṅgha). Wikipedia. 2. Faith in a more contemporary understanding will mean to have verified confidence in the meditation, our ability to do the mediation, and the teacher/teachings that have shown us the way. allan cooper.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

Spiritual Faculties (indriya) and Five spiritual faculties (indriya-samatta): 1. Equilibrium, Balance, or Harmony of the Faculties, relates to the five spiritual faculties: Faith, Energy, Mindfulness, Concentration, and Wisdom. 2. The spiritual faculties are more important to the practice of vipassanā than this definition seems to imply. Balance of the mind/heart opens oneself to enlightenment. The practice of meditation is a constant process of refining of our intuitive abilities through the understanding of the Three Characteristics and only when the spiritual faculties are balanced can this occur. allan cooper 3. SN 48.10. Indriya-vibhanga Sutta: Analysis of the Mental Faculties. 4. Buddhist Dictionary; indriya-samatta. p. 67.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya

We functionally strengthen the indeterminate mental factors: The Abhidhamma in Practice, N.K.G. Mendis. Section, The Cetasikas, subcategory, Sankharas. Access to Insight.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya