39

Slow Down

This is more important than it would appear on the surface. Aside from your formal sitting/walking practice and your focus on sampajañña, slowing down can be the single most useful technique towards the development of continuity of your attention to arise. Slowing down allows time to reflect and it gives time for sati-sampajañña to be generated toward the thought, sense object, or activity at hand. It is fuel for the cultivation of intention, effort, sampajañña and patience. It takes strong restraint and renunciation to slow down which allow for greater intention, energy and investigation to be exercised.
As much as possible during normal everyday activities make physical actions deliberate and couple these actions with a focus towards sati-sampajañña. Try to notice actions throughout a sequence. Start with the intention to move and then to the beginning of the actual movement. Watch for when the sequence ends. Hint: When you miss the beginning of any movement, pay particular attention to when you end that movement. For instance, when you put something down, observe. Attending to the end of a movement or the end of any sense object heightens attention throughout and gives rise to a greater probability of picking up the beginning of the next action or sense object. Also, pay particular attention to how often your body makes unconscious types of physical actions such as touching your face or wiggling your foot or scratching an itch or adjusting your glasses or posture while sitting or standing. All is made more clearly known by slowing down as much as possible.
Slow road

Slow Down

This is more important than it would appear on the surface. Aside from your formal sitting/walking practice and your focus on sampajañña, slowing down can be the single most useful technique towards the development of continuity of your attention to arise. Slowing down allows time to reflect and it gives time for sati-sampajañña to be generated toward the sense object or activity at hand. It is fuel for the cultivation of intention, effort, sampajañña and patience. It takes strong restraint and renunciation to slow down which allow for greater intention, energy and investigation to be exercised.
Slow road
As much as possible during normal everyday activities make physical actions deliberate and couple these actions with a focus towards sati-sampajañña. Try to notice actions throughout a sequence. Start with the intention to move and then to the beginning of the actual movement. Watch for when the sequence ends. Hint: When you miss the beginning of any movement, pay particular attention to when you end that movement. For instance, when you put something down, observe. Attending to the end of a movement or the end of any sense object heightens attention throughout and gives rise to a greater probability of picking up the beginning of the next action or sense object. Also, pay particular attention to how often your body makes unconscious types of physical actions such as touching your face or wiggling your foot or scratching an itch or adjusting your glasses or posture while sitting or standing. All is made more clearly known by slowing down as much as possible.