43

Use Chanting, Reflection and Determinations

Regularly scheduled chanting and formal reflections are valuable tools to inspire faith, set intention and galvanize effort. Many yogis find it valuable to pay homage to the Buddha, take refuge in the Buddha/Dhamma/Sangha, take the Precepts, to share merit (puñña), do mettā, and ask and offer forgiveness. Respecting what we do sets wholesome intention and when coupled with wise reflection the practices deepen and the commitment matures.  As mentioned above, mealtimes are another excellent opportunity to develop a chanting practice.
       Another useful chanting reflection is to do formal forgiveness for yourself and others. It can be a preliminary practice before every formal meditation session. Apply a silent loving chuckle into the mind stream when you reflect on failures. Remind yourself that you are starting again fresh.
     Other traditional chanting subjects include the brahma viharas (the Four Noble Abodes), the pāramis (the Ten Perfections), and forgiveness (khama). Chanting offers an opportunity to utilize reflection which otherwise is often under-emphasized and therefore under-utilized in Western style vipassanā practice. Chanting is also a mirror on the mind’s engagement and clarity. When chanting notice whether or not the phrases are being done by rote or if there is a reflective and respectful attention present. Watching carefully offers a way to assess the qualities of investigation, effort and faith (saddhāand to notice if the hindrances (nīvaranas) are present. Chant in your native tongue or in Pāli depending on how you think your character will best benefit. Check this out. Translate your chants and see which works better for you.

chanting

Use Chanting, Reflection and Determinations

Regularly scheduled chanting and formal reflections are valuable tools to inspire faith, set intention and galvanize effort. Many yogis find it valuable to pay homage to the Buddha, take refuge in the Buddha/Dhamma/Sangha, take the Precepts, to share merit (puñña), do mettā, and ask and offer forgiveness. Respecting what we do sets wholesome intention and when coupled with wise reflection the practices deepen and the commitment matures.  As mentioned above, mealtimes are another excellent opportunity to develop a chanting practice.
       Another useful chanting reflection is to do formal forgiveness for yourself and others. It can be a preliminary practice before every formal meditation session. Apply a silent loving chuckle into the mind stream when you reflect on failures. Remind yourself that you are starting again fresh.
     Other traditional chanting subjects include the brahma viharas (the Four Noble Abodes), the pāramis (the Ten Perfections), and forgiveness (khama). Chanting offers an opportunity to utilize reflection which otherwise is often under-emphasized and therefore under-utilized in Western style vipassanā practice. Chanting is also a mirror on the mind’s engagement and clarity. When chanting notice whether or not the phrases are being done by rote or if there is a reflective and respectful attention present. Watching carefully offers a way to assess the qualities of investigation, effort and faith (saddhāand to notice if the hindrances (nīvaranas) are present. Chant in your native tongue or in Pali depending on how you think your character will best benefit. Check this out. Translate your chants and see which works better for you.

chanting

Going for Refuge & Taking the Precepts, Bhikkhu Bodhi. 2. See Homage, Refuges, and Precepts in the index.

Merit (puñña): 1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merit (Buddhism). Wikipedia. 2. Sharing merit (puñña-dhārā), in some variation is to silently or out loud offer phrases such as, “I share whatever merit I have with all beings everywhere so they too, like myself, may attain happiness, peacefulness and complete freedom from suffering.’ 3. Merit: A Study Guide, Thanissaro Bhikkhu., Mudita: The Buddha’s Teaching on Unselfish Joy, Access to Insight.

Mettā (Loving-kindness): 1. ‘The Four Sublime States: Contemplations on Love, Compassion, Sympathetic Joy and Equanimity.’ 2. Nyanaponika Thera. Note: Kindness is the balance of all four.

See mealtime chant in the index.

Formal Forgiveness: See suggestion at end of the Guide.

The Four Sublime States (brahma viharas):  Contemplations on Love, Compassion, Sympathetic Joy and Equanimity, Nyanaponika Thera. http://www.vipassana.com/meditation/four_sublime_states.php.

Paramis: See footnote 42.

Forgiveness (khamā). (adj.) forgiving; enduring; bearing tolerance; patience; endurance. Wisdom Dictionary.

Faith (saddhā): 1. Faith in early Buddhism focused on the Triple Gem, that is, the Buddha; his teaching (the dharma); and finally, the community of spiritually developed followers or the monastic community seeking enlightenment (the saṅgha). Wikipedia. 2. Faith in a more contemporary understanding will mean to have verified confidence in the meditation, our ability to do the mediation, and the teacher/teachings that have shown us the way. allan cooper.

Abbreviations in footnotes: AN: Aṅguttara Nikāya, DN: Dingha Nikāya, MN: Majjhima Nikāya, SN: Saṃyutta Nikāya