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Use Daily and End-of-Retreat Reviews

Late in the day before your last sit, review how the day went. Do this with as much kindness and curiosity as possible. Some find a five-to-ten minute journaling or reflection about an incident during the day can bring greater clarity and stimulate effort the next day. You can choose one incident (skillful or unskillful) to review, or perhaps conduct an overview of what type of mental factors were most predominant throughout the day. Examine the quality of the intention that preceded the incident, the quality of thought/speech/action that accompanied the incident, and the consequences both for the short and long term. With active non-judgmental analysis, take a look at what might be done should something similar arise in the future.
As you do this exercise, notice if judgement is accompanying the assessment of the incident or if there’s space to simply observe. In either case, notice the judgement or the space and continue your review with an eye towards kindness. Ask yourself, ‘How can I improve or tweak the practice tomorrow to support my stated goals? How can I use this time for increased friendliness through training and investigation?’
      Finally, at the end of the Home Retreat, make an appointment with
Woman-writing-in-journal
your wise friend to review what you’ve done and what you’ve learned during the retreat. Be meticulously honest with yourself and the person with whom you are speaking, and report what your intentions were at the beginning of the retreat, what you did, what you didn’t do, what you learned and what you want to improve during the next Home Retreat.

Use Daily and End-of-Retreat Reviews

Late in the day before your last sit, review how the day went. Do this with as much kindness and curiosity as possible. Some find a five-to-ten minute journaling or reflection about an incident during the day can bring greater clarity and stimulate effort the next day. You can choose one incident (skillful or unskillful) to review, or perhaps conduct an overview of what type of mental factors were most predominant throughout the day. Examine the quality of the intention that preceded the incident, the quality of thought/speech/action that accompanied the incident, and the consequences both for the short and long term. With active non-judgmental analysis, take a look at what might be done should something similar arise in the future.
As you do this exercise, notice if judgement is accompanying the assessment of the incident or if there’s space to simply observe. In either case, notice the judgement or the space and continue your review with an eye towards kindness. Ask yourself, ‘How can I improve or tweak the practice tomorrow to support my stated goals? How can I use this time for increased friendliness through training and investigation?’
Woman-writing-in-journal
      Finally, at the end of the Home Retreat, make an appointment with your wise friend to review what you’ve done and what you’ve learned during the retreat. Be meticulously honest with yourself and the person with whom you are speaking, and report what your intentions were at the beginning of the retreat, what you did, what you didn’t do, what you learned and what you want to improve during the next Home Retreat.