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Micro-Moments Make a Whole

All too often during our everyday lives, the momentum of doing and getting things done creates an illusion of constancy, a forest rather than many individual trees. Home Retreat in its various ways supports us to look at the trees in order to better appreciate and understand the forest. Another tool that supports our study of the forest is to notice micro-moments of direct and clear sati when they arise. For many of us these moments happen spontaneously and not infrequently. Every day there will be moments when we experience a sight, sound, smell, taste, sensation or even a thought in a very rendered and basic way. We see, or taste, or feel or simply notice a thought for being a thought and nothing more or we sense a touch or see only color or form with little or no attachment in the moment. Just the experience. Fortunately and unfortunately these moments are brief which allows us to move on with our task and day. Yet to ignore these moments and not support them with a few added moments of reflection can cause them to lose some of their power and value.
      I suggest two exercises to help notice these moments. First, when a micro-moment of pure sati arises bring your focus to it, see what happens with this added focus on it, see if you can notice the quality of the sati and then notice what happens next. Is it ‘watching/observing,’ 
and/or does it quickly become ‘I am watching/observing?’ If it is the
man_doing_laundry
latter, notice the posture of I’m watching’ and try not to evaluate or judge and just carry on yet try to remember what just ‘watching’ was like.
      The second exercise is to cultivate these types of micro-moments of sati on a fairly regular basis throughout our day. The more frequently we support the arising and noticing of micro-moments of sati, the more 

Micro-Moments Make a Whole

All too often during our everyday lives, the momentum of doing and getting things done creates an illusion of constancy, a forest rather than many individual trees. Home Retreat in its various ways supports us to look at the trees in order to better appreciate and understand the forest. Another tool that supports our study of the forest is to notice micro-moments of direct and clear sati when they arise. For many of us these moments happen spontaneously and not infrequently. Every day there will be moments when we experience a sight, sound, smell, taste, sensation or even a thought in a very rendered and basic way. We see, or taste, or feel or simply notice a thought for being a thought and nothing more or we sense a touch or see only color or form with little or no attachment in the moment. Just the experience. Fortunately and unfortunately these moments are brief which allows us to move on with our task and day. Yet to ignore these moments and not support them with a few added moments of reflection can cause them to lose some of their power and value.
man_doing_laundry
      I suggest two exercises to help notice these moments. First, when a micro-moment of pure sati arises bring your focus to it, see what happens with this added focus on it, see if you can notice the quality of the sati and then notice what happens next. Is it ‘watching/observing,’ and/or does it quickly become ‘I am watching/observing?’ If it is the atter, notice the posture of I’m watching’ and try not to evaluate or judge and just carry on yet try to remember what just ‘watching’ was like.
      The second exercise is to cultivate these types of micro-moments of sati on a fairly regular basis throughout our day. The more frequently we support the arising and noticing of micro-moments of sati, the more we strengthen a variety of mental factors. This, in turn, enables us to access sati more readily and in ever more basic ways, both spontaneously and when doing formal practice.