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we strengthen a variety of mental factors. This in turn enables us to access sati more readily and in ever more basic ways, both spontaneously and when doing formal practice.
      Here are two quick tips: First, take some activity that you do mindlessly over and over again throughout the day and give a moment’s quick sati or reflective sampajañña to that activity. For instance, reaching, then touching, then holding your keys. Are they cold, sharp, heavy, light? Also, notice the intention to pick up the keys and ask yourself, ‘Am I going someplace for wholesome reasons? Is this trip necessary?’ Reaching, then touching, then using pressure to open, pass through and close the door. You may also focus on the urge to urinate/defecate, the intention to do so, the process of getting you to the bathroom, the process of evacuating or urinating. Notice also what the mind is doing, paying attention to cleaning and going on to the next activity. The second tip, and maybe most challenging as well as likely most rewarding to your investigation, is waking up to the automatic behaviors that surround your use of screen time. This is especially true regarding the smartphone. How about bringing attention to every urge to touch your phone, the reaching, the activity, the value of the activity, the putting it away, or simply noticing the urge and observing the urge until it changes.
Seurat1884
      The more often we string moments of sati-sampajañña together or simply add these types of moments to our day, the more we are effectively de-conditioning our patterns as well as the blindness to our patterns. I often look at this type of practice like a string of pearls. Our lives are the string and the pearls are moments of wisdom. The more moments of wisdom, the more valuable and beautiful the necklace becomes.
      Here are two quick tips: First, take some activity that you do mindlessly over and over again throughout the day and give a moment’s quick sati or reflective sampajañña to that activity. For instance, reaching, then touching, then holding your keys. Are they cold, sharp, heavy, light? Also, notice the intention to pick up the keys and ask yourself, ‘Am I going someplace for wholesome reasons? Is this trip necessary?’ Reaching, then touching, then using pressure to open, pass through and close the door. You may also focus on the urge to urinate/defecate, the intention to do so, the process of getting you to the bathroom, the process of evacuating or urinating. Notice also what the mind is doing, paying attention to cleaning and going on to the next activity. The second tip, and maybe most challenging as well as likely most rewarding to your investigation, is waking up to the automatic behaviors that surround your use of screen time. This is especially true regarding the smartphone. How about bringing attention to every urge to touch your phone, the reaching, the activity, the value of the activity, the putting it away, or simply noticing the urge and observing the urge until it changes.
Seurat1884
      The more often we string moments of sati-sampajañña together or simply add these types of moments to our day, the more we are effectively de-conditioning our patterns as well as the blindness to our patterns. I often look at this type of practice like a string of pearls. Our lives are the string and the pearls are moments of wisdom. The more moments of wisdom, the more valuable and beautiful the necklace becomes.